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FAQ's

Q1: How do patients make an appointment with a hospital in Shanghai?
Q2: Is interpretation service available at the hospital?
Q3: What do I do if problems occur after I return to my home country?
Q4: Is Shanghai hospital accredited by a reputable third-party organization?
Q5: Have these organizations ever taken any disciplinary actions against the Shanghai hospital?
Q6: Are the Shanghai hospital’s doctors licensed and credentialed?
Q7: Are any of these doctors internationally trained?
Q8: What training and licensing do Shanghai hospital nurses, pharmacists, imaging and lab technicians receive?
Q9: Does Shanghai employ foreign doctors?
Q10: How much experience does Shanghai have treating international patients? What facilities does the hospital have in place specifically for international patients?
Q11: How does the Shanghai hospital prevent potentially-dangerous drug interactions?
Q12: Will I have trouble communicating?
Q13: How are a patient’s rights to competent medical treatment protected?
Q14: What measures does the Shanghai hospital take to ensure patient safety?
Q15: What should I prepare for my appointment at Shanghai Medical Tourism?
Q1: How do patients make an appointment with a hospital in Shanghai?
Obtain the information about the hospital, such as the procedures they specialize in, through the Shanghai Medical Tourism Products and Promotion Platform website (www.shmtppp.com), register in and contact the consultants by email or telephone and ask for details on procedures, prices and reservations.
Q2: Is interpretation service available at the hospital?
Hospitals treating foreign patients have medical tour coordinators who are capable of speaking foreign languages. If coordinators are not available, the hospital will have professional interpreters ready for patients to services conveniently and safely during any period of consultation and surgery.
Q3: What do I do if problems occur after I return to my home country?
There are several kinds of medical tourism insurance products, which may cover the unpredictable incident occurred during the period such as package loss, trip delay, trip cancellation, or infection when you back to home. Make sure whether you need any insurance before your coming. Please consult with your medical tourism consultant.
Q4: Is the hospital accredited by a reputable third-party organization?

Yes. Shanghai Huashan Hospital was the leading hospital accredited by the Joint Commission International (JCI), the international arm of the organization that reviews and accredits American hospitals. Their checklist includes over 350 standards, for everything from surgical hygiene and anesthesia procedures to the systems in place to credential medical staff and nurses. JCI sends a team to re-review accredited hospitals at 3-year intervals.

Shanghai also has its own Hospital Accreditation program such as ISO and others. Shanghai East Hospital was the first hospital in the country to be accredited by this program in 1999.

Q5: Have these organizations ever taken any disciplinary actions against the hospital?
No. Neither accrediting organization has ever taken any disciplinary action against Shanghai. Both JCI and the Chinese Hospital Accreditation Authority have procedures in place to deal with complaints and concerns received from patients concerning their accredited hospitals. When requested, Shanghai has always provided all requested information to the independent reviewers in such cases. The hospital has met all requirements and has never been disciplined or had its accreditation withdrawn or restricted in any way by either accrediting organization.
Q6: Are the hospital’s doctors licensed and credentialed? bullet_top Back to Top
Yes. All Shanghai physicians are fully licensed by the Chinese Medical Council to practice their specialty in Shanghai. In addition, many are Board Certified in their specialty in the US, Australia, or Europe. Shanghai’s credentialing process requires a formal review of each doctor’s qualifications and track record by the Credentials and Bylaws Committee and the Hospital’s Medical Executive Committee. These reviews take place before a doctor is appointed to the medical staff by the Hospital’s Board of Governors and then again every three years thereafter.

A summary of each physician’s qualifications is available when you search for a doctor on this website. If you would like to review the qualifications or specific experience of your physician in more detail when you arrive we can arrange for you to do so. Also, our International Medical Coordination Office (10 doctors and 20 nurses on our administrative staff) can address questions or concerns you may have regarding your procedure before you make the decision to schedule your visit.
Q7: Are any of these doctors internationally trained?
Yes. Over 200 are US-board certified, and many others were trained and certified in Europe, Japan, or Australia.
Q8: What training and licensing do hospital nurses, pharmacists, imaging and lab technicians receive?
Nurses, pharmacists, imaging and lab technicians must undergo schooling and pass certification exams to obtain licenses to practice in Shanghai. Nurses are re-certified at 5-year intervals. Those with special responsibilities (such as ICU nurses) must receive special training and be certified as competent in those areas. Shanghai nurses also receive special English language training and ongoing continuing education covering a wide range of patient safety issues.
Q9: Does Shanghai employ foreign doctors? bullet_top Back to Top
Most of our practicing physicians are Chinese. Shanghai does employ some international doctors based on WTO framework, they are allowed to practice in Shanghai maximum one year, and others are in administrative and coordination roles, helping us better understand and manage patients from different cultures.
Q10: How much experience does Shanghai have in treating international patients? What facilities does the hospital have in place specifically for international patients?
Shanghai has more than 800,000 foreigners as fortune 500 firms’ managers and business people from 150 different countries. And Shanghai East Hospital can treat 40000 international patients per year. We know of no other hospital in China that treats more international patients than Shanghai East Hospital currently does. Facilities we have in place specifically for international patients include:
  • International Medical Coordination Office: 10 doctors and 20 nurses on administrative staff who coordinate scheduling of procedures, attendant family logistical questions during treatment, and follow-up care planning.
  • International Referral Offices: 4 offices in US which specialize in arranging appointments and making travel arrangements for International patients.
  • International Referral Center: 6 specially trained staff who respond to between 100 and 500 medical inquiry e-mails every day.
  • International Interpreter Services: 50 interpreters covering virtually all languages spoken by our patients. For those few patients whose languages are not covered we make special communication arrangements.
  • International Travel and Visa Services: A unique relationship with Shanghai’s largest ground services Travel Company to arrange any travel needs for patients and families while in Shanghai. The Chinese INS operates a visa extension service once a week to process any needed visa extensions for patients and their families.
  • International Hotels on Campus: 10 world class hotels are operated specifically for international patients. These hotels are offered to Shanghai’s international patients at favorably competitive rates to comparable hotels in the area.
Q11: How does the hospital prevent potentially-dangerous drug interactions?
Shanghai uses software currently updated four times a year with an international drug database, to check for potentially harmful drug interactions.
Q12: Will I have trouble communicating? bullet_top Back to Top
English is widely spoken around the hospital. You will be able to communicate in English with Shanghai doctors, medical and customer service staff. We also employ 50 interpreters to help patients who speak other languages.
Q13: How are a patient’s rights to competent medical treatment protected?
All patients in Shanghai are protected by Chinese law, codes of medical conduct, and a Patient Bill of Rights enforced by the Chinese Ministry of Health. Patients may complain directly to the Chinese Ministry of Health. These organizations have the power to enforce remedies because they grant licenses to hospitals and their doctors. You may also complain to the Chinese Consumer Protection Agency or the police, or take legal action in a Chinese court.

When considering any overseas treatment it is important to understand that any legal disputes (either medical care or commercial) concerning your care will be decided in the country of treatment, not your country of origin or citizenship.
Q14: What measures does the hospital take to ensure patient safety? bullet_top Back to Top
Shanghai considers the quality of patient care, patient safety, and continuous improvement to be at the core of our mission. We follow patient safety practices outlined by the standards of our accrediting organizations (JCI and Chinese HA). Our facility was built to comply with US hospital building and fire safety standards. Medical care is continuously monitored by both hospital and medical staff committees and the hospital continuously tracks over 500 patient safety and clinical quality measures. Our dedicated team vigorously reviews every concern raised by patients, doctors, administrators, and hospital quality organizations with regular reports of their findings to the hospital’s management team, medical staff, and Board of Governors.
Q15: What should I prepare for my appointment at Shanghai International? bullet_top Back to Top
If you are a new patient, please come 30 minutes before your appointment time with your doctor to allow for registration and vital sign screening. Please bring a list of any medications or herbal remedies you are currently taking. If you are insured, please also bring your insurance card or policy documents with you. All patients under 20 must also be accompanied by a parent or official guardian in case permission is required for a procedure.